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Corvettes In Camaro Wrappers

  • This ’68 Camaro was photographed at Wayne Due’s Chassis Shop in Marysville, Washington, where it was being built. The car features one of Wayne’s bolt-in Corvette IFS subframes. This particular Camaro was also equipped with Corvette rear suspension. - 0
  • The front view without the engine shows the location of the Ford Fox platform rack and pinion unit. Wayne mounts the rack low enough for the engine to remain in its stock location. The street rod style steering shaft and U-joints are visible in the photo. - 1
  • This shot of a Wayne Due Camaro subframe shows what the assembly looks like out of the car. The subframe retains all the factory sheetmetal mounting locations. The caliber of brake components is up to the customer. - 2
  • There is ample clearance for all the necessary accessories that are needed to complete the car. Block-hugger style exhaust headers are used. The subframe can be used with some pretty aggressive tires. - 3
  • C4 Corvettes and their components are plentiful. Wayne often buys a whole frontend package, so the engine and transmission can be used along with the suspension. - 4
  • Looking up from underneath a Camaro with the Corvette subframe shows how well everything fits. This ’67 Camaro has a big-block engine and a 5-speed manual transmission. - 5
  • The Corvette rear independent suspension kit uses weld-on brackets to locate and secure the whole Corvette IRS unit. Adjustable coil-over shock absorbers are used. - 6
  • This is a fully assembled Camaro with the rear Corvette IRS. Notice how the exhaust and gas tank all fit nicely with the new suspension. - 7
  • Wayne Due is holding up the two brackets that need to be welded to each frame rail in order to install the Corvette rear suspension. The brackets were already welded to this car. - 8
  • This side view shows how the four links (two per side) locate the Corvette IRS to the Camaro. - 9
  • Some modifications to the rear wheelwells are necessary when the Corvette rear IRS is installed. You can tell by the fresh seam sealer how much the fenderwells were widened. Wayne is pointing to the notched section where the front bars mount. - 10
  • Looking underneath the rear wheelwells shows the two welded-on brackets and the amount of metal massaging that was done. The special crossmember is also visible. - 11
  • Wayne Due’s Corvette suspension subframe for early Novas is different from the Camaro unit in that it has upper tubes that bolt to the firewall. Most of the inner fender panels were cut off for added clearance. - 12
  • Since early Novas are so narrow, wheels with lots of negative offset must be used. There is still ample turning room. - 13
  • Wayne Due ships his Camaro subframes all over the country, but many owners prefer to send their cars to Wayne’s shop for either suspension installation or complete buildups. There are usually several Camaros in various states of completion in his shop. - 14
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by Bruce Caldwell  More from Author

Bolt-On Vette IFS For Early Camaros

Adding modern drivetrain components to classic Camaros is a popular thing to do. Late-model fuel-injected engines, automatic overdrive transmissions, six-speed manual transmissions, and Corvette independent suspension are all things being added to first generation Camaros. Wayne Due of Wayne Due’s Chassis Shop in Marysville, Washington (www.waynedue.com) is one of the leading innovators in the area of Corvette suspension kits for all kinds of cars and trucks.

Wayne’s specialty is early Camaros, but he has also installed Corvette suspension in everything from a 1942 Lincoln Zephyr convertible to Chevy pickups, Novas, Chevelles, and GTOs. Besides offering his bolt-in Camaro subframe kits, Wayne also builds complete cars. An example of his work is the red ’67 Camaro convertible on the cover of this magazine.

What Wayne sells the most of is the Camaro front subframe. This fully welded unit simply replaces the stock subframe. The new subframe uses Corvette front suspension components from ’84-’87 models. The hub-to-hub distance is 61-inches. These cars and their components are readily available at wrecking yards. Prices are reasonable.

Sometimes Wayne buys the entire front half of the Corvette including engine, transmission, suspension, wheels, tires, and whatever else is still attached. Many Camaro owners elect to install virtually the complete Corvette running gear and suspension.

The Wayne Due Chassis Shop subframe uses new rack and pinion units from Ford Fox body vehicles. Either the manual or power steering versions can be used. Wayne positions the rack low enough that the engine can be mounted in its stock location.

Wayne also offers a rear Corvette suspension setup for early Camaros. This unit is a weld-in one, so installation is more involved. Like the front suspension, the rear kit uses ’84-’87 Corvette components. The hub-to-hub width is 61-inches, which is only two inches more than the Camaro’s 59-inch width. It’s much easier to accommodate a variety of wheels with the ’84-’87 Dana 44 unit. The wider the suspension, the more negative offset the wheels need.

It’s possible to use the rear suspension from a 1988-1996 Corvette, but these cars have a 63-inch width. That means C5 Z/06 style wheels must be used for adequate fender clearance.

Installing Corvette IFS is a substantial improvement in the Camaro’s handling capabilities. A secondary benefit is the vastly improved brakes. It’s like having all the modern technology benefits of a Corvette wrapped up in a classic Camaro package.





This ’68 Camaro was photographed at Wayne Due’s Chassis Shop in Marysville, Washington, where it was being built. The car features one of Wayne’s bolt-in Corvette IFS subframes. This particular Camaro was also equipped with Corvette rear suspension.




The front view without the engine shows the location of the Ford Fox platform rack and pinion unit. Wayne mounts the rack low enough for the engine to remain in its stock location. The street rod style steering shaft and U-joints are visible in the photo.




This shot of a Wayne Due Camaro subframe shows what the assembly looks like out of the car. The subframe retains all the factory sheetmetal mounting locations. The caliber of brake components is up to the customer.




There is ample clearance for all the necessary accessories that are needed to complete the car. Block-hugger style exhaust headers are used. The subframe can be used with some pretty aggressive tires.




C4 Corvettes and their components are plentiful. Wayne often buys a whole frontend package, so the engine and transmission can be used along with the suspension.




Looking up from underneath a Camaro with the Corvette subframe shows how well everything fits. This ’67 Camaro has a big-block engine and a 5-speed manual transmission.




The Corvette rear independent suspension kit uses weld-on brackets to locate and secure the whole Corvette IRS unit. Adjustable coil-over shock absorbers are used.




This is a fully assembled Camaro with the rear Corvette IRS. Notice how the exhaust and gas tank all fit nicely with the new suspension.




Wayne Due is holding up the two brackets that need to be welded to each frame rail in order to install the Corvette rear suspension. The brackets were already welded to this car.




This side view shows how the four links (two per side) locate the Corvette IRS to the Camaro.




Some modifications to the rear wheelwells are necessary when the Corvette rear IRS is installed. You can tell by the fresh seam sealer how much the fenderwells were widened. Wayne is pointing to the notched section where the front bars mount.




Looking underneath the rear wheelwells shows the two welded-on brackets and the amount of metal massaging that was done. The special crossmember is also visible.




Wayne Due’s Corvette suspension subframe for early Novas is different from the Camaro unit in that it has upper tubes that bolt to the firewall. Most of the inner fender panels were cut off for added clearance.




Since early Novas are so narrow, wheels with lots of negative offset must be used. There is still ample turning room.




Wayne Due ships his Camaro subframes all over the country, but many owners prefer to send their cars to Wayne’s shop for either suspension installation or complete buildups. There are usually several Camaros in various states of completion in his shop.



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