Advertisement

Featured Stories

Street Rod Icons - 1932 Ford Roadsters

  •  - 0
  • Burt Litton of Marietta, Georgia, took the traditional full-fendered approach with his beautiful 1932 Ford roadster. - 1
  • This is the classic street rod look – essentially as Henry made it, except for the dropped headlight bar and dropped I-beam front axle. - 2
  • The other classic 1932 Ford roadster look is a fenderless highboy with steel wheels, hubcaps, and bias ply front tires. - 3
  • Classic flathead power for a classic street rod. - 4
  • A variation on a theme – a 1932 Ford roadster pickup. - 5
  •  - 6
  • The rear view of a 1932 roadster isn’t as iconic as the front, but it’s still a very attractive car. - 7
  • Print

provided by

Source

by Bruce Caldwell  More from Author

Top Ten Iconic Street Rods.

Images by Bruce Caldwell and Jerry Heasley


It’s ironic that the most iconic street rod of all, the 1932 Ford roadster, was a one-year wonder. Henry Ford was known for maximizing model runs (e.g., almost twenty years for the Model T), but the extremely handsome 1932 Ford was a single year body style. Most of the innovative V-8 running gear and chassis technology carried over, but the distinctive grille was a one-shot.

The styling of the 1932 Ford can be thought of as the ultimate refining of the Model A, since there is a natural progression between the two cars. For whatever reasons the 1932 Ford is the car that symbolizes hot rodding.

Early hot rodders were more attracted to the powerful new V-8 engine than the styling. The flathead V-8 (named for the design of its cylinder heads – the valves are located in the block, not the heads) was to the thirties what the small-block Chevy V-8 was to the fifties and beyond. Later versions of the flathead Ford (1946-1953) ruled hot rodding well into the fifties.

The incredible popularity of the 1932 Ford roadster boosted prices to a point where it became economically feasible to reproduce the car in fiberglass. A whole industry grew up around fiberglass 1932 Fords, and technology has now made it possible to accurately reproduce metal 1932 bodies.

The 1932 Ford roadster (affectionately known as the Deuce) has been built in many forms, but the two most popular are the fenderless highboy and the full-fendered street rod. Generally speaking, the highboys are considered more hot rods (greater performance potential), while the fendered versions are considered street rods.



Street Rod Icons
Street Rod Icons


Street Rod Icons - Woodies
Street Rod Icons - Woodies


Street Rod Icons - 1937-1938 Chevys
Street Rod Icons - 1937-1938 Chevys


Street Rod Icons - 1932 Ford Roadsters
Street Rod Icons - 1932 Ford Roadsters


Street Rod Icons - 1940-1941 Willys Coupes
Street Rod Icons - 1940-1941 Willys Coupes


Street Rod Icons - Model A Fords
Street Rod Icons - Model A Fords


Street Rod Icons - Model T Fords
Street Rod Icons - Model T Fords


Street Rod Icons - 1939-1940 Ford Coupes
Street Rod Icons - 1939-1940 Ford Coupes


Street Rod Icons - 1933-1934 Fords
Street Rod Icons - 1933-1934 Fords


Street Rod Icons - 1933-1935 Chevys
Street Rod Icons - 1933-1935 Chevys


Street Rod Icons - 1932 Ford Coupes
Street Rod Icons - 1932 Ford Coupes

COMMENTS

Find Articles

Please select a field.

To

 GO
 

Advertisement

 

Magazines

Magazines

Put your passion into gear

From Customs, Chevys, Fords to the Classics, these magazines provide the latest cutting edge information to fuel your passion.

MODEL INFORMATION

Required Information

 GO