Advertisement

Featured Stories

Street Rod Icons - Woodies

  • Woodie wagons are incredibly popular, whether in their original configuration or modified as street rods. - 0
  • The popular street rod look adds modern running gear and a low stance to mostly restored bodies. - 1
  •  - 2
  •  - 3
  • Surfers were early woodie fans, so surfboards or surfing decals are popular woodie accessories. - 4
  •  - 5
  • Ford dominated the woodie market, but most other manufacturers were involved, too. - 6
  • Mercury also made woodies, as evidenced by this beautiful 1951. - 7
  •  - 8
  • By the fifties, manufacturers were using mostly metal, with wood being more of a trim item. - 9
  • Print

provided by

Source

by Bruce Caldwell  More from Author

Top Ten Iconic Street Rods.

Images by Bruce Caldwell and Jerry Heasley.


Woodies are a body style, not a brand or year of car. The term “woodie” comes from the type of construction used to build these early station wagons. At the time of their origin, manufacturers didn’t have the capabilities to stamp out steel bodies the size of station wagons. It wasn’t until 1935 that Chevrolet introduced the all-steel-bodied Suburban Carryall, and it was essentially a panel truck with windows and extra seats.

Woodie wagons with varying percentages of wood and steel remained in production through the early fifties. Even though technology existed to build all-metal wagons, the wood bodies were marketed as upscale vehicles for transporting affluent people to their summer estates or resorts. The "station" part of “station wagon” refers to transporting passengers to and from the train station (at the country end of the line).

Wood-bodied wagons required lots of tedious upkeep to preserve the wood. When these wagons reached the end of their gentrified life cycle, surfers picked them up. That led to surf woodies, which remains a popular theme among woodie builders.

As the wood content diminished, many manufacturers maintained the wood look with decals. Even though those cars aren’t technically woodies, they’re still included in this genre because they look like woodies.

Ford led in the production of wooden-bodied wagons (and a few rare Sportsman woodie convertibles). One of the reasons was that Ford owned huge forests just for wood body production. Many non-Ford woodie wagons were custom made by coachbuilders. That trend continues today, with custom-built “phantom” woodies for when all that’s left of an original woodie is the steel cowl.



Street Rod Icons
Street Rod Icons


Street Rod Icons - Woodies
Street Rod Icons - Woodies


Street Rod Icons - 1937-1938 Chevys
Street Rod Icons - 1937-1938 Chevys


Street Rod Icons - 1932 Ford Roadsters
Street Rod Icons - 1932 Ford Roadsters


Street Rod Icons - 1940-1941 Willys Coupes
Street Rod Icons - 1940-1941 Willys Coupes


Street Rod Icons - Model A Fords
Street Rod Icons - Model A Fords


Street Rod Icons - Model T Fords
Street Rod Icons - Model T Fords


Street Rod Icons - 1939-1940 Ford Coupes
Street Rod Icons - 1939-1940 Ford Coupes


Street Rod Icons - 1933-1934 Fords
Street Rod Icons - 1933-1934 Fords


Street Rod Icons - 1933-1935 Chevys
Street Rod Icons - 1933-1935 Chevys


Street Rod Icons - 1932 Ford Coupes
Street Rod Icons - 1932 Ford Coupes

COMMENTS

Find Articles

Please select a field.

To

 GO
 

Advertisement

 

Magazines

Magazines

Put your passion into gear

From Customs, Chevys, Fords to the Classics, these magazines provide the latest cutting edge information to fuel your passion.

MODEL INFORMATION

Required Information

 GO