Advertisement

Guides

The Missing Link

  • 1. This shot taken from underneath a 5-link-equipped Mustang shows how the system was designed to fit with the factory tailpipes, offer reasonable access to the differential and allow the use of a rear sway bar. The 5-link is the tubular bar just behind the welded square tubing cross brace. - 0
  • 2. Here is a Steeda 5-Link 2 Suspension System mounted on a display rack, which shows the components without the exhaust. The 5-link is basically level when mounted in the car. - 1
  • 3. The Steeda 5-link is adjustable at both ends. All the fasteners and components are extra heavy duty. The 5-link is also known as a Panhard rod or bar. Its job is to locate the rear axle and eliminate lateral movement. The Panhard rod connects the body to the rear axle via a body bracket on the left and an axle bracket on the right. - 2
  • 4. This angle shows how the rod ends can be moved up and down inside the rigid channel. This allows the roll center height adjustment to vary between 8- and 10.5-inches. This shot also shows how the rectangular tubing mounting brace clamps to the axle housing on the right side of the system. - 3
  • 5. The Steeda 5-Link System replaces the factory 4-link, so new upper links and mounting brackets are part of the system. Polyurethane bushings are used for minimal deflection and maximum control. The links and brackets are zinc plated. - 4
  • 6. This wider shot of the display 5-Link 2 System shows a rear shock tower brace. This makes the chassis even more rigid to help eliminate power-wasting chassis flex. The factory upper link mounts are still attached to the axle housing. You can see how the new system moves the upper links outward so they’re parallel to the wheels. The Panhard Rod now handles lateral movement. - 5
  •  - 6
  • Print

provided by

Source

by Bruce Caldwell  More from Author

A 5-Link System Will Reduce Roll Center Height And Increase Cornering Capability

Aftermarket suspension engineers are constantly seeking ways to improve on the factory Mustang suspension systems. The Mustang’s rear 4-link system is a good design, but by adding another link for a 5-link system cornering grip will be dramatically improved.


A 5-link system is also known as a Panhard rod system. A Panhard rod (or Panhard bar) is a lateral locating link to keep the rearend where it belongs. Through the use of mounting brackets, the Panhard rod is attached to the body on the left side of the car and to the axle housing on the right.


A 5-link system offers improved stability, better suspension geometry, improved anti-squat geometry, positive lateral control, increased traction and better roll control. Brake dive is reduced thanks to the adjustable anti-squat geometry. The 5-link not only helps you go faster, but it also aids braking.


5-link suspension systems are common on racecars, but the Steeda 5-Link 2 Suspension System was designed to be a streetable version. It allows the tailpipes to remain in their factory location. The rear sway bar can also be retained. The Steeda 5-link Panhard bar is strong and lightweight since it’s made out of 4130 chrome moly tubing.




The adjustable nature of the Steeda 5-link allows a Mustang to be tuned from neutral to oversteer to understeer to suit driving styles or track conditions. The lower the adjustment position, the more the car will understeer. Raising the link promotes oversteer.




This shot taken from underneath a 5-link-equipped Mustang shows how the system was designed to fit with the factory tailpipes, offer reasonable access to the differential and allow the use of a rear sway bar. The 5-link is the tubular bar just behind the welded square tubing cross brace.




Here is a Steeda 5-Link 2 Suspension System mounted on a display rack, which shows the components without the exhaust. The 5-link is basically level when mounted in the car.



The Steeda 5-link is adjustable at both ends. All the fasteners and components are extra heavy duty. The 5-link is also known as a Panhard rod or bar. Its job is to locate the rear axle and eliminate lateral movement. The Panhard rod connects the body to the rear axle via a body bracket on the left and an axle bracket on the right.




This angle shows how the rod ends can be moved up and down inside the rigid channel. This allows the roll center height adjustment to vary between 8- and 10.5-inches. This shot also shows how the rectangular tubing mounting brace clamps to the axle housing on the right side of the system.




The Steeda 5-Link System replaces the factory 4-link, so new upper links and mounting brackets are part of the system. Polyurethane bushings are used for minimal deflection and maximum control. The links and brackets are zinc plated.




This wider shot of the display 5-Link 2 System shows a rear shock tower brace. This makes the chassis even more rigid to help eliminate power-wasting chassis flex. The factory upper link mounts are still attached to the axle housing. You can see how the new system moves the upper links outward so they’re parallel to the wheels. The Panhard Rod now handles lateral movement.



SOURCE:
Steeda Autosports
1351 NW Steeda Way
Pompano Beach, FL 33069
954-960-0774
www.steeda.com
info@steeda.com

COMMENTS

Find Articles

Please select a field.

To

 GO
 

Advertisement

 

Magazines

Magazines

Put your passion into gear

From Customs, Chevys, Fords to the Classics, these magazines provide the latest cutting edge information to fuel your passion.

MODEL INFORMATION

Required Information

 GO